Perfect teams of a SBU

Eight Roles in a Perfect Team for SBU
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Contain the correct mix of two different types of role

• functional roles, such as engineer or help desk
• team roles

  • Team roles are defined as an individual’s tendency to behave, contribute and interact with others in a particular way.

  • These are the nine team roles. This does not mean that the ideal team contains nine people, all resolutely sticking to a role assigned to them at birth! It does mean that, for example, a team of five people should be able to cover all nine roles effectively.

  • Each role contributes particular strengths to the team. They also have weaknesses. These weaknesses are allowable since the members of a perfect team both tolerate and compensate for one another’s weaknesses.

Rock:
Characteristics

Individualistic, serious-minded, unorthodox.

Rocks are innovators and can be highly creative. They provide the seeds from which major developments grow. Usually they prefer to operate by themselves at some distance from the other members of the team, using their imagination and often working in an unorthodox way. They tend to be introverted and react strongly to criticism and praise. Their ideas may often be radical and may lack practical constraint.

Rocks are independent, clever and original, and may be weak in communicating with other people on a different wavelength.


COORDINATOR:

Characteristics

Calm, self-confident, controlled.

The distinguishing feature of Co-coordinators is their ability to cause others to work towards shared goals. Mature, trusting and confident, they delegate readily. In interpersonal relations they are quick to spot individual talents and to use them to pursue group objectives. While Co-coordinators are not necessarily the cleverest members of a team, they have a broad and worldly outlook and generally command respect.


SHAPER:

Characteristics

Highly-strung, outgoing, dynamic.

Shapers are highly motivated people with a lot of nervous energy and a great need for achievement. Often they seem to be aggressive extraverts with strong drive. Shapers like to challenge, to lead and to push others into action – and to win. If obstacles arise, they will find a way round – but can be headstrong and emotional in response to any form of disappointment or frustration.

Shapers can handle or even thrive on confrontation.




TEAM WORKER:

Characteristics

Socially orientated, rather mild and sensitive.

Team Workers are the most supportive of a team. They are mild, sociable and concerned about others, with a great capacity for flexibility and adapting to different situations and people. Team Workers are perceptive and diplomatic. They are good listeners and are generally popular members of a group. They cope less well with pressure or situations involving the need for confrontation.


IMPLEMENTER:

Characteristics

Conservative, dutiful, predictable.

Implementers are well organized, enjoy routine, and have a practical common sense and self-discipline. They favour hard work and tackle problems in a systematic fashion. On a wider front they hold unswerving loyalty to the organization and are less concerned with the pursuit of self-interest.

However, Implementers may find difficulty in coping with new situations.


COMPLETER-FINISHER:

Characteristics

Painstaking, orderly, conscientious, anxious.

Completers, or Completer-Finishers, have a great capacity for follow-through and attention to detail, and seldom start what they cannot finish. They are motivated by internal anxiety, even although outwardly they may appear unruffled. Typically they are introverts who don’t need much external stimulus or incentive. Completer-Finishers dislike carelessness and are intolerant of those with a casual disposition. Reluctant to delegate, they prefer to tackle all tasks themselves.


SPECIALIST:

Characteristics

Professional, self-starting, dedicated.

Specialists are dedicated individuals who pride themselves on acquiring technical skills and specialist knowledge. Their priorities are to maintain professional standards and advance their own subject. While they show great pride in their own work, they usually lack interest in other people’s work and even in other people themselves. Eventually, the Specialist becomes the expert by sheer commitment along a narrow front. Few possess the single-mindedness, dedication and aptitude to become a first-class Specialist.